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Cricket terms -Glossary

All out – when an innings is ended due to ten of the eleven batsmen on the batting side being either dismissed or unable to bat because of injury or illness

Appeal – The act of a bowler or fielder shouting at the umpire to ask if his last ball took the batsman’s wicket. Usually phrased in the form of howzat (how-is-that?)

Arm ball – A deceptive delivery bowled by an off spin bowler that is not spun, so, unlike the off break, it travels straight on (with the bowler’s arm).

Asking rate – The run rate at which the team batting second needs to score to catch the opponents score in a limited overs game

Average -A bowler’s bowling average is defined as the total number of runs conceded by the bowler (including wides and no-balls) divided by the number of wickets taken by the bowler.

Bail – One of the two small pieces of wood that lie on top of the stumps to form the wicket

Beach cricket – An informal form of the game played on beaches, particularly in Australia, New Zealand, Sri Lanka and cricket-playing Caribbean countries

Block hole : The area between where the batsman rests his bat to receive a delivery and his toes. It is the target area for a yorker.

Bouncer -A fast short pitched delivery that rises up near the batsman’s head

Boundary

1.  the perimeter of the ground

2.  four runs. Also used to mention a four and a six collectively

3.  the rope that demarcates the perimeter of the ground

Bye – Extras scored in the same way as normal runs when the ball does not make contact with any part of the batsman (bat, protective gear, body parts)

Catch – To dismiss a batsman by a fielder catching the ball after the batsman has hit it with his bat but before it hits the ground.

Caught and bowled : When a player is dismissed by a catch taken by the bowler.

Caught behind : A catch by the wicket-keeper.

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